CEU Courses

These classes are tailored towards Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Registered Behavior Technicians, and ABA Therapists. Participants in the virtual CEU will receive a certificate on completion of a class. Speakers are responsible for providing high-quality content in the area of their expertise.

These courses were created to support Bierman STARS (Sharing Training for Autism Related Services).

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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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16 Results

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This webinar will describe the problems many parents face and then discuss a general problem-solving approach that will help understand how problem behaviors arise, how to deal with them, and, more importantly, how to prevent them in the first place.

    Abstract: 

    Most parents fly on automatic pilot when raising their children. Such a strategy—if it can be called that—works to varying degrees. However, when it doesn’t work, parents seek help and advice from various sources, ranging from their children’s physicians to social media. Often, parents wait until they’re at their wit’s end and are desperate before seeking help. Being a good parent is a difficult job. Because behavior is a natural event, however, the most effective strategies for dealing with unwanted behavior and for teaching desired behavior is based on the science of behavior analysis. This webinar, based on my recent book, How to Build Good Behavior and Self-Esteem in Children, will describe the problems that many parents face and then discuss a general problem-solving approach that will help in understanding how problem behaviors arise, how to deal with them, and, more importantly, how to prevent them in the first place. The target audience is parents and BCBA practitioners who work with parents or carry out parent training.

    Bio: 
    How to Build Good Behavior and Self-Esteem in Children
    Click image to find the book on Amazon

    Henry D. (Hank) Schlinger Jr. received his Ph.D. in psychology (applied behavior analysis) from Western Michigan University (WMU) under the supervision of Jack Michael. He then completed a two-year National Institutes of Health-funded post-doctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology also at WMU with Alan Poling. Dr. Schlinger was a full-tenured professor of psychology at Western New England University in Springfield, MA, before moving to Los Angeles in 1998. He is now a professor of psychology and current director of the ABA Specialization Option and BCaBA course sequence, and former director of the M. S. Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlinger has published approximately 100 scholarly articles, chapters, commentaries, and book reviews in more than 35 different journals and books. He also has authored or co-authored four books, Psychology: A Behavioral Overview (1990), A Behavior-Analytic View of Child Development (1995) (which was translated into Japanese), Introduction to Scientific Psychology (1998), and How to Build Good Behavior and Self-Esteem in Children (2021). He is the past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and The Behavior Analyst (now Perspectives on Behavior Science) and sits on the editorial boards of several other journals. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and the Advisory Board of The B. F. Skinner Foundation and The Venus Project (https://www.resourcebasedeconomy.org/advisory-board/). Dr. Schlinger received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University in 2012 and the Jack Michael Award for Outstanding Contributions in Verbal Behavior from the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group of the Association for Behavior Analysis International in 2015. 

    Hank is also an accomplished songwriter and guitarist. He has performed solo and with bands for many decades, both in his hometown of Dallas, Texas and in his adopted town of Los Angeles, California. His album, One More Invention, can be found on Spotify. He is also a reviewer of classical music concerts and recordings, and his reviews can be found at Culturespotla.com.

    Three Learning Objectives:

    Be able to identify five troublesome patterns/problems between parents and children with examples. Be able to say what the term " discipline " literally means. Be able to identify, with examples, the faulty explanation of behavior called circular explanation. Be able to recognize the definition of environment and the three implications of the definition. Be able to explain what reinforcement is and how it can be used to teach desirable behavior and prevent undesirable behavior. Be able to say what self-esteem means and how using positive reinforcement can lead to self-esteem.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This training will focus on identifying key motor skills that lead to more complex play behavior, deciphering teaching arrangements based on learner profiles, and choosing materials to catapult learning.

    Abstract: 

    The core deficits of autism, including restricted or repetitive behaviors and impaired social interaction, can often lead to a limited play repertoire (Faras et al., 2010). Learning and exploring through play is also a behavioral cusp that significantly expands their environment, learning new skills and access a wider range of reinforcers. This makes play an important skill to teach when working with children in an early intervention setting. The early stages of play include a range of behaviors, from simple motor movements to complex paired actions and vocalizations. A proven method to assess the need for intervention is breaking larger, complex skills down and identifying the component motor skills needed to succeed (Kubina, 2019). Once a motor movement is determined to be a deficit, there are ways to intervene in a naturalistic, discrete trial training or fluency-based instruction teaching arrangement. After deciding the type of teaching strategy to use, it is imperative the correct materials are chosen. This training will focus on identifying key motor skills that lead to more complex play behavior, deciphering teaching arrangements based on learner profiles, and choosing materials to catapult learning. 

    Bio: 

    Christina Gallagher is a Precision Teacher and practitioner in Applied Behavior Analysis. Her passion for helping children led her to Temple University, where she received a Master’s in Special Education and later became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. In the last five years, Christina has dedicated her efforts to support early intervention for children with Autism. She is currently working on an instructional library in programming for staff and is a part of the clinical training team.  

    Three Learning Objectives: 
    1. Assess the need for intervention on motor skills needed for complex play behavior
    2. Choose a teaching arrangement based on the learner profile
    3. Curate materials and activities to work on specific skills
  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    The behavior analysis field is growing exponentially, with more individuals training to receive BCBA certifications. For the benefit of our field and the populations we serve, it is of growing importance that we evaluate our supervision practices for effectiveness and efficiency. This training will explore a different way to measure trainees’ progress and outcomes due to our supervision.

    About this CEU:

    The behavior analysis field is growing exponentially, with more individuals training to receive BCBA certifications than ever before.  For the benefit of our field and the populations we serve, it is of growing importance that we evaluate our supervision practices for effectiveness and efficiency.  This training will explore a different way to measure trainees’ progress and outcomes due to our supervision. 

    About the Presenter:

    Kelly LeBlanc is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and Licensed Applied Behavior Analyst in the state of Massachusetts. Kelly has worked in the field of ABA since 2013, primarily working with children diagnosed with ASD. She began supervising trainees in the field in 2016 and quickly fell in love with the subject. Kelly has served as a supervisor to trainees both at Bierman Autism Centers and at Simmons University. In her free time, Kelly enjoys hiking, playing board games and spending time with her cats.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Identify and recognize critical sections and features of diagnostic reports and how to interpret them

    3 Learning Objectives:
    Identify critical sections and features of diagnostic reports
    Learn how to recognize common cognitive assessments and how to interpret them
    Determine how to interpret adaptive behavior data

    Presenter Bio:
    Allison has been working in the field of behavior analysis since 2006 and has been a Behavior Analyst since 2013. She has worked in multiple settings, including home, school, clinic, and insurance.

    Catherine has been working in the field of ABA since 2011 and is currently a licensed psychologist in New Jersey and a doctoral BCBA. As a diagnostician, she is passionate about bridging the gap between diagnostic and therapy services.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of sleep problems reported in children with ASD, the effects of these sleep problems on children and caregivers, and a review of behavioral interventions to address sleep problems effectively.

    This BCBA Ethics CEU will cover:

    Sleep problems are a common occurrence among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In addition to the challenges that sleep problems present for children’s neurodevelopment, learning, and daytime behaviors, sleep problems in children present significant challenges for the entire family. Research on behavioral interventions to address sleep problems in young children has shown them to be effective. These interventions have often been combined in multicomponent behavioral training programs to teach parents/caregivers to assess and intervene to improve children’s various sleep problems. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of sleep problems reported in children with ASD, the effects of these sleep problems on children and caregivers, and a review of behavioral interventions to effectively address sleep problems.

    3 learning objectives:

    Attendees will list and describe the types of sleep problems children with ASD present and the effects of those sleep problems for the children and their caregivers.
    Attendees will review the literature supporting behavioral interventions to address sleep problems and will apply the various procedures to common sleep problems displayed in children with ASD.
    Attendees will examine the challenges and mitigating solutions to obtaining reliable data collection and fidelity of implementation when providing caregiver training to address sleep problems.

    Bio:

    Kylan Turner, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA, has worked with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) since 2003. In 2009, Kylan was selected for a two-year Leadership and Education in Neuro-developmental Disabilities (LEND) Fellowship specializing in ASD; and developed and disseminated a training curriculum focused on applied behavior analytic (ABA) intervention to community organizations throughout Pennsylvania. She graduated with her Ph.D. in Special Education in 2012 from the University of Pittsburgh.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This presentation will discuss the advocacy efforts behind the passage of legislation requiring insurance coverage for autism and the systemic change this has created.

    About the Course

    This presentation will discuss the advocacy efforts behind the passage of legislation requiring insurance coverage for autism and the systemic change this has created.

    About Amy Weinstock

    Amy Weinstock is the Director of the Autism Insurance Resource Center at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center and an instructor in the medical school’s Department of Psychiatry. She has an extensive background on insurance issues related to autism and has played a key role in passing several significant pieces of autism insurance legislation in Massachusetts, including the groundbreaking 2010 law requiring health insurance to cover medically necessary treatment for autism. Amy also serves as a trustee of the Riverview School and as a Commissioner on the State’s Autism Commission.

    Amy’s work has been recognized through numerous awards, including the Federation for Children with Special Needs Martha H. Ziegler Founders Award, the Margaret L. Bauman Award for Excellence, the Massachusetts ARC’s Distinguished Citizens Award, the Autism Speaks Advocacy Award, the Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation’s Shining Star and Essential piece awards, and the Northeast ARC’s Edward C. O’Keefe Memorial Award. She graduated from Wellesley College and received a Masters of Architecture from Harvard University.

    The cost for the CEU event is $10. The proceeds benefit Bierman STARS which helps fund pro-bono services to families struggling to access services.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Learn how to create meaningful instructional materials that promote generalization and maintenance with Christina Gallagher.

    About the Course

    This presentation will discuss the advocacy efforts behind the passage of legislation requiring insurance coverage for autism and the systemic change this has created.

    The cost for the CEU event is $10. The proceeds benefit Bierman STARS which helps fund pro-bono services to families struggling to access services.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This presentation dives into what ableism is at a deeper level, the concerns around ableism, the benefits of being anti-ableist, and how we can incorporate anti-ableist practices into our field of ABA more specifically.

    About the Course

    While the science of behavior analysis is eclectic, currently, the industry of applied behavior analysis (ABA) predominantly serves the Disabled community (BACB, n.d.). As such, behavior analysts have both an opportunity and a duty to be both service providers for and partners with the Disabled community. ABA researchers and clinicians have published a plethora of research and articles about disability and autism treatment, but not necessarily about what it is like to be disabled and autistic or how to partner with those communities. Our field operates within a greater society that is structured under a very ableist lens. In other words, it is a society discriminative against people with disabilities of any kind (Oxford, n.d.). Given our prevalence and commitment to the Disabled community, we have a duty to confront these societal norms and strive to become anti-ableist. While one of the first usages of the word ‘ableism’ did not show up until 1986 (Oxford, n.d.) and the Americans with Disabilities Act was not enacted until 1990 (ADA, n.d.), that is still over 30 years that this word and concept has been in our community. Society is slowly coming to understand what it means to be anti-ableist, and this concept is starting to permeate the zeitgeist of ABA. Our field has a momentous opportunity to make an impact on our community. We can elevate to a model that shows what it is to be anti-ableist. Clinicians have dedicated their lives to helping and serving the Disabled community. Let us ensure they do so in an empowering way instead of a well-intentioned yet ableist way. May we show by example how to take responsibility when we do wrong and how to choose a new course of action that is in support of the community which we serve. This presentation dives into what ableism is at a deeper level, the concerns around ableism, the benefits of being anti-ableist, and how we can incorporate anti-ableist practices into our field of ABA more specifically.

    References
    ableism. Oxford Reference. (n.d.). https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095344235.
    ada.gov. ADA.gov homepage. (n.d.). https://www.ada.gov/.
    Behavior Analyst Certification Board. (n.d). BACB certificant data. Retrieved from https://www.bacb.com/BACB-certificant-data.
    Morton, B. (2011, August 30). Falser words were never spoken. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/30/opinion/falser-words-were-never-spoken.html.

    About Dr. Milyko

    Dr. Kerri Milyko joined CentralReach as the Director of Clinical Programming as of October 2019. In this role, she and her team create a fully-digital, integrated, evidence-based curriculum to service the needs of neurodiverse learners, CR Elements. Before this role, she served as Director of Research and Development of The Learning Consultants and Director of Development and Outreach of Agile Learning Solutions (formerly known as Precision Teaching Learning Center). Dr. Kerri is also adjunct faculty at the University of West Florida, where she created and teaches their VCS, master’s-level Instructional Design class.

    Her primary behavior analytic focus is on measurement, instructional design, precision teaching, direct instruction, percentile schedules of reinforcement, compassionate-focused applied behavior analysis, behavioral education, and better products for clinicians.

    Finally, Dr. Kerri volunteers on various boards. In 2019, she was elected to serve 3 years on the Board of Directors for the Standard Celeration Society, where she currently resides as the Chairperson. In the same year, she was appointed by the governor of Nevada to serve on the first-ever Board of Applied Behavior Analysts to create ABA practice regulations for the state for licensure, where she served as President for 2019. Recently, in August of 2021, she was elected as a Trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.

    Personally, Kerri values quality time with her three children, her husband, and dear friends. She loves wine and butter, true crime podcasts, and a good sci-fi novel while tinkering in her backyard.

    The cost for the CEU event is $10. The proceeds benefit Bierman STARS which helps fund pro-bono services to families struggling to access services.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Learn about the role your programming plays in appropriate stimulus control with Chrissy Barovsky, MA, BCBA.

    About the Course

    According to Skinner (1938), stimuli that accompany or precede responses that are reinforced can come to influence those responses in important and often complex ways. Stimuli with complex features may result in only one aspect or feature of that stimulus gaining control over the behavior (Rincover & Koegel, 1975). Individuals with autism may require that behavioral interventions include carefully planned contingencies to ensure the proper development of stimulus control, including discrimination, generalization, and concept formation. Thus, stimuli used within behavioral intervention must be systematically used and carefully designed to maximize the client’s outcomes and promote discrimination, generalization, and maintenance of the skills taught.

    About Chrissy Barosky

    MA in Applied Behavior Analysis and Education; Teachers College, Columbia University
    BS in Human Services, Northeastern University

    Chrissy Barosky joined Bierman ABA in 2013 as a Behavior Analyst and is now the Chief Clinical Officer. Chrissy has been working in the field of ABA as a practicing Behavior Analyst since 2008, and before that, in the field of developmental disabilities since 2005. Before working in the center-based setting at Bierman, Chrissy worked in home-based ABA settings and consulted in schools and as a special educator. In addition to overseeing all clinical operations at Bierman ABA, Chrissy is also Adjunct Faculty at Simmons University and Endicott College, where she teaches masters level courses on verbal behavior, behavior analytic methodologies and organizational behavior management (OBM). Chrissy obtained her bachelor’s degree from Northeastern University in Human Services, her master's degree from Columbia University in Applied Behavior Analysis and Education, and is completing her Doctorate in Behavior Analysis at Simmons University. Chrissy’s research interests are in Verbal Behavior, specifically in early language acquisition and how it ties into joint attention and staff training and its impact on client outcomes. Chrissy has presented at various local and national conferences, including the Association for Behavior Analysis International.

    The cost for the CEU event is $10. The proceeds benefit Bierman STARS which helps fund pro-bono services to families struggling to access services.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    The presenter will provide a conceptual analysis of problem-solving and present research on using visual imagining, self-questioning, and mobile apps to teach recalling past events and answering social questions.

    About the Course

    Problem-solving is defined as manipulating stimuli to increase the probability of solving a problem. When faced with a problem, such as a math problem, a question about a past event, or a question about driving directions, an individual solves by engaging in a few behaviors, such as working out the problem on paper, asking herself questions, visualizing, “Googling it,” or using other phone apps. A challenge of analyzing problem-solving is it often occurs covertly or within an individual’s skin. The presenter will provide a conceptual analysis of problem-solving and present research on using visual imagining, self-questioning, and mobile apps to teach recalling past events and answering social questions. Behavior analysts should analyze and teach problem-solving to produce less rote responses and more generalization

    About Dr. Judah Axe

    As a faculty member of Simmons College in the Behavior Analysis department, Judah teaches master’s courses in the areas of single-subject design, methods of instruction, and verbal behavior. Judah teaches doctoral courses on verbal behavior, advanced single subject design, and behavioral consultation in schools. He designed two courses in the online master’s program: single subject design and verbal behavior. He also supervises a research lab with doctoral students where we conduct studies on verbal behavior, problem-solving, antecedent interventions for challenging behavior, and social behavior.

    Degrees:
    Ph.D., Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis, 2008
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
    M.A., Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis, 2005
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
    B.S., Molecular Biology, 2000
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

    The cost for the CEU event is $10. The proceeds benefit Bierman STARS which helps fund pro-bono services to families struggling to access services.